Library

Altamont’s library is a spacious, well-equipped center for research, reading, study and computer use. Its purpose is to provide materials and space for students and teachers to research and prepare materials for class assignments, as well as for personal informational needs and recreational reading.

The vision of the Altamont Library is to provide a place for students and teachers to navigate the explosion of information as expert consumers and top quality producers of collaborative projects.

The library houses over 14,000 items, including books, videos, DVDs and CDs. In addition, one daily newspaper and 20 periodicals are available. Altamont students have access to a variety of online databases, including QuestiaSchool, Salem Press history databases, and Brain Pop in addition to numerous databases provided by the Alabama Virtual Library. The library also provides 20 computers for student use and wireless access for students who bring their own computers.

The librarian instructs students in library use, research skills and information literacy in conjunction with assignments given by the faculty. Teachers regularly bring classes to work on assignments during their class periods. The library can accommodate three classes each period if the classes are using different resources.

Individual students may use the library before and after school, during Activities period and lunch and also when they check out of class or study hall for academic work. Library hours are 7:00 a.m. to 4:50 p.m. Monday through Friday. Students can access library resources 24/7 through the library Haiku page.

The library can be a successful, busy learning environment only if everyone respects the needs of others. While in the library, patrons are expected to conduct themselves in such a way that they do not disturb those who are reading, writing or searching for material.

Caitlin Rogers, Librarian
crogers@altamontschool.org

The Altamont Library strives to provide resources and instruction to meet the Information Literacy standards as set forth in Information Power, the 1998 publication of the American Association of School Librarians:

Information Literate

  • Access information efficiently and effectively.
  • Evaluate information critically and competently.
  • Use information accurately and creatively.

Independent Learners

  • Pursue information related to personal interest.
  • Appreciate literature and other creative expressions of information.
  • Strive for excellence in information seeking and knowledge generation.

Socially Responsible

  • Recognize the importance of information in a democratic society.
  • Practice ethical behavior in regard to information and information technology.
  • Participate effectively in groups to pursue and generate information.